Avoid businesses that blog spam

“I am genuinely thankful to the holder of this website who has shared this fantastic article at here.”

Look at that great grammar. So commented “Bad Credit Car Finance,” an outfit in Orlando, Florida, which has a raft of videos on YouTube hawking their services. That in itself is not a bad thing, but blog spamming is the mark of an unethical and/or outright criminal enterprise. As I’ve written about before, this is a scummy tactic used by shadowy enterprises the world over.

A few years ago I set up a bulletin board that never really saw a lot of use, and then I forgot about it until last month when Google kindly gave me a heads-up that it was infested with user spam. There were over 75,000 spam comments from automatically-generated “user” bots, most of them for knockoff goods and penis enlargement products, porn, dating services, and anything else disreputable that your imagination could come up with. A quick perusal was enough to verify an already-known fact: If someone is leaving spam comments on your blog (or someone else’s), that person or business has neither ethics nor morals, and should be avoided like the plague.

junk

It’s worth mentioning that Joe Oliver, the man who apparently runs this outfit, has a talent for making the most hideously poor-quality advertising videos I’ve seen in a long time. That in itself is worth some sort of “razzie.”

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Avoid businesses that blog spam

  1. It gets even worse – But I have to formulate the response post Very Carefully, these are the type that toss off Lawsuits to take down critical information…

    Just got a junk US-Mail letter offering “Electrician’s Success Day!” from a company in Sarasota FL whose whole scam is to make you into a scammer, but their letter is really skimpy on facts so I had to Google them up – And BOY did I get an eye-full.

    First, they trick you (the contractor) into a very expensive buy-in for a Franchise in either Plumbing, Heating and Air, Electrical or Roofing, (names deliberately withheld…) with a very stiff locked-in fee structure, before you find out what they really do… And they’ll go after your personal credit if you try to break or cancel the contract, no doubt – time to hire a Lawyer.

    Then once you’re hooked they purport to “teach” you and your top aides how to high-pressure sell and overcharge all your customers on your way to endless riches and 10+ weeks of vacations every year.

    Matter of fact, they want your Outside Salesmen to /not/ be technicians, to know absolutely nothing about how the systems work, because they might say something smart – all they’re supposed to do is spread FUD and convince people they need a complete replacement right now, just sign here.

    But the part they don’t get is, those scams can only work in cities with over a million residents, because word gets around far too fast in small cities. Yelp and such are changing that, but it takes time.

    And in this big city where it might work, I’ve seen a grand total of one truck under one of those dodgy franchise names, so they aren’t even fooling contractors into signing up. Or they’re smart enough to leave their trucks unmarked, one never knows.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s